Rebooting basic services: hope for policy reform? (2)

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New ideas for policy reform from Bell

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Update on other reactions to Turcke/Bell (1:10pm): Pete Nowak has his own biting critique in yesterday’s post – If VPN use is theft, then Bell’s CraveTV is extortion. And over at OpenMedia.ca, Josh Tabish has stirred up some really unfriendly reactions on Facebook about the whole fiasco – 181 315 and counting. (When I showed the FP article to my teenage daughter, her eye-rolling reaction was, OMG, as if using a VPN is hacking.)

As I suggested in my last post, some of the conclusions reached at the Rebooting conference will be echoed in the current CRTC proceeding on basic service objectivesDespite all the compelling reasons for reform, however, numerous barriers stand in the way. Some of those discussed at the conference will certainly play a continuing role in the broadband proceeding…

1 – No political will or vision. Short of improbable legislative change, we need something the Harper government is incapable of formulating: a national digital strategy. The CRTC suggested the need for a national strategy six years ago in its new media decision (2009-329, para 78). What we got from the Tories instead was a lousy marketing brochure. Even the opposition parties seem to regard our broadband future as unworthy of serious attention. Continue reading

Netflix redux: it’s not the content, stupid, it’s the connectivity (1)

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“We are now ready to take our place as the most technologically advanced nation on the planet.” – Stephen Harper, Digital Canada 150, April 2014, p.4

In my previous post I argued that the showdown last month between Netflix and the CRTC has a silver lining: it has pointed the way to a new role for the Commission. That role would acknowledge that the job of trying to regulate “broadcasting” content in the Internet age has become a mug’s game. On the other hand, Canadians have never had world-class broadband connectivity, no matter how much the Harper gang try to spin the story. Speeds here are too slow, service is lousy and prices are way too high. Hence the new role: make connectivity – not content – the Commission’s top priority.

Ottawa has given us low expectations to go with our low bandwidth

What should Canada be aiming for in the broadband future? Continue reading

Just like cable-TV, broadband is still way too expensive in Canada

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Point Topic releases 2014-Q1 global survey of broadband prices

Research consultancy Point Topic has another set of broadband data to add to the dismal news about Canada. Using USD adjusted by the purchasing power parity formula (PPP), they find that of the 90 countries surveyed, Canada ranks in 58th place on the price for a monthly standalone broadband subscription. We’re just under the global mean of $76.61, one step ahead of Mexico. Continue reading

The CRTC tries to drag our TV “system” into the 21st century

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The public hearing announced by the CRTC last week (Broadcasting Notice of Consultation CRTC 2014-190) came with two other newsworthy documents.

One is the Commission’s trial balloon on instituting a pick-and-pay system for TV subscribers, which takes the official form of the CRTC’s Response to Order in Council P.C 2013-1167 (“Maximizing the ability of Canadian consumers to subscribe to discretionary services on a service by service basis” – here). This document contains the seeds of what might be a significant reform to the channel-bundling model. Continue reading

Digital Canada 150: why the Tory plan is risky, not just foolish

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April 17 and a couple of updates

1 – Data caps. Not quite a breaking news update (on my caps comments at the end ofpost-dc150-caps-2 this post), since this story appeared in Ars Technica on March 13. “Time Warner Cable has been offering customers $5 monthly discounts in exchange for giving up unlimited data for the last couple of years, but almost no one has taken the company up on its offer.” In fact, only a few thousand of TWC’s 11.5 million customers have done so.

Here’s the deal: any TWC sub who wants to save the $5 a month can do so by cutting their cap from unlimited to… 30 GB! Jon Brodkin does the math and figures that three months of “excessive” Internet use and that sub loses a year’s worth of savings. The USA’s second most-despised ISP (after Comcast) has a story for that. CEO Rob Marcus claims his customers must value unlimited – duhdoy. Continue reading